Post-Super Bowl Syndrome

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By Justin Brisson > Sophomore > Journalism > University of Missouri

We are now just over a week removed from Super Bowl XLV, and I’ve had plenty of time to reflect on what transpired during the game.  Boy, have we been lucky lately.  This year’s championship marked the fourth such enthralling game in a row.  In 2008, the rebel New York Football Giants wrecked the New England Patsies’ hopes of going 19-0 on an incredible fourth-quarter touchdown drive.

  The following year, we were given the great pleasure of watching the Arizona Cardinals come up just barely short of achieving the unlikely, thanks to an insane fourth-quarter touchdown pass from Ben Roethlisberger to Santonio Holmes.  Last year, the New Orleans Saints bore the city on their back en route to the team’s first Super Bowl championship.  Cornerback Tracy Porter sealed the deal with a  late TAINT that all but put Peyton Manning, er, I mean, the Indianapolis Colts out of their misery.  Then, miraculously, the football gods graced NFL fandom with another nail-biter.
 
For once, the experts were right.  For whatever reason, most people on sports syndicates predicted that Aaron Rodgers would lead the Green Bay Packers to a close victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers.  Undoubtedly you will see people on television gloat about their correct prediction for the next year.  I guarantee you there would be no mention of it by most, however, if those same men and women picked the Steelers.
 
My prediction, naturally, was wrong.  If I side with my brain, my gut feeling ends up with the honor of being correct.  If I side with my gut feeling, my brain is given the distinction.  Welp, if you can’t beat yourself, beat someone else!  So ha-ha John Clayton — I knew the Steelers wouldn’t want to go four- and five-wide all day!  I told you they should run, run, run!  So there!  Take that….

 

 

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